Tag Archives: Arwell

Almost a Your Face Joke

I gave myself a little chuckle while I was writing War for the North yesterday (now testing the title The Longest Shadow instead). I came this close to writing a ‘your face’ joke and I had to share.

Finneas peered at the woman, making no effort to disguise his scrutinising gaze. Subtlety had never been his strong point in the face of commoners.

“What do you suppose happened to her face?”

“Well whatever it was, I know you won’t be happening to her face.”

“She’s far too skinny,” Finneas said. “All skin and sinew by the look of it. Not a whore at any rate. Not with that face.”

Arwell was about to make a remark about Finneas’ own face when Prince Marle stalked into the throne room. The crowd knelt before him as he made his way to the throne, his expression one of perpetual irritation.

© Jessica Wiles, 2013

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Introduction to Lord Arwell Hallworth

I really got into writing Arwell’s biography. As it turns out he’s far more interesting than Colm who is starting to look very boring. Shame. He has a very sad life, but he handles it all well…mostly…

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My Day Off

I’ve done a fair amount of work recently. Sure, I didn’t write all of it down, but the pieces of the story are locked away safely in my head where I will definitely NOT forget them. So I thought, maybe I need a little break from work, just before I turn to editing my assessments. I planned a day of Xbox, maybe some Tales of Vesperia, a film perhaps, more Poirot? I watched Dog the Bounty Hunter then came crawling back to my laptop.

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War for the North – Meeting the Lords

Lord Wolsey’s chambers were grander than Middle City and the City of the Mountain put together. The central room was round and had a long table for dining at its centre, the walls were decorated with banners in the Wolsey colours. A spiral staircase took Lind to her room at the top of the tower, while Guth and Colm had rooms below hers. There were five rooms altogether and Lind supposed Lord Wolsey had a lot of guests. Her room consisted of a table, although Colm called it a desk, and a large feather bed. Lind had only slept in a bed a handful of times, but never had she slept in a bed so soft. Lying on it was almost unbearable. There was a large wardrobe, as Colm called it, where she should put her clothes, though Lind explained that she only had the clothes she wore. The room was otherwise sparse. It had none of the decorations that the dining room had, though Colm explained it was due to Lord Wolsey’s recent death. He left her to settle into her room, taking Guth with him.

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